Piedmont Wine Lexicon

Piedmont Wine Lexicon - A

Abberen plucking the berries from the stems before fermentation; happens automatically Tapping The goals that are pursued with tapping are diverse. First of all, the wine is loosened from its storage (the yeast residues), its lees (depot) and undissolved parts of the fruit pulp and grape skins. Another effect is the release of carbonic acid, making the wine softer and more accessible. In addition, the sulphurisation and the treatment of the wine with other additives can now begin. Overall, the wine begins to stabilize after fermentation. Age of the vines In a wine study from 2002 - 2006, the wine...

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Piedmont Wine Lexicon - B

Balsamic Balsams are herbal secretions or viscous solutions made from resin and essential oils from plants such as balsam poplar, balsam fir and balsamic herb. These tertiary substances are used in medicine and perfumery and have a resinous, slightly bitter and noble effect. When it comes to wines, these flavors are highly regarded. They often arise in connection with the barrel aging. The spectrum of balsamic aromas includes nuances of vanilla, sandalwood, myrrh, frankincense, pine resin, camphor, beeswax, oak, pine, eucalyptus, honey, fir, juniper berries and cedar. Barbaresco The Barbaresco comes from the Langhe region in Piedmont, Italy. As the...

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Piedmont Wine Lexicon - D

DOCG DOCG (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita = controlled and guaranteed designation of origin) is the highest evaluation level for Italian wines and is thus above the quality level DOC. DOCG wines have to meet strict requirements in terms of grape varieties, growing area, yield, harvest and aging. For example, they are not allowed to be stored in tanks - not even temporarily. In 2009, the EU standardized the national and regional rating systems as part of its wine market regulation. In Italy, the DOC and DOCG wines fell into the EU DOP level. However, winegrowers are allowed to...

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Piedmont Wine Lexicon - E

stainless steel tank Fermentation in a stainless steel tank is a reductive fermentation that uses less oxygen than fermentation in wooden barrels. The stainless steel tank spread in the wine business from the 1960s. Its advantages are high standards in terms of hygiene, because a tank made of stainless steel is absolutely easy to care for and the high chromium content on the surface combines with the oxygen to form a protective layer that prevents rust. In addition, a Stainless steel tank absolutely impermeable to air. Since it doesn't work entirely without oxygen, the wine can be supplied with dosed...

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