Piedmont Wine Lexicon - G

Gavi

The Gavi, also Cortese di Gavi, is one of the most popular white wines in Italy. It is made entirely from the Cortese grape variety. Its original growing area is the eponymous municipality of Gavi in ​​eastern Piedmont, where wine production has been documented since 972. The Piedmont wine is characterized by a young and fresh aroma, which is characterized by the taste of white flowers, almonds, peaches and citrus fruits. In addition, the white wine has a fine acidic taste, mineral freshness and elegance. Typical of the wine are also its early maturation, the production in an airtight tank and the fizzy carbon dioxide. Its alcohol content is around 10.5% vol. The Gavi goes well with spring-like, summery, light and fish-rich cuisine. It is also an important base wine for preparing sparkling wine.

Whole bunch fermentation

Whole bunch fermentation has been the traditional form of winemaking since the innovation of the destemming machine. If the traditional method is used again today, this is done under different conditions, because today, unlike in the past, attention is paid to selection. This means that only ripe stems and stems should also be fermented.

Whole grape fermentation has several effects on the wine. Since the black horses consist of 50 - 80% water, the wine is slightly diluted so that the alcohol content is reduced by between 1 and 1.5% vol. Since the stalks and stems absorb the anthocyanins, i.e. the coloring agents in the wine, the wines also become slightly lighter. More interesting for the winemaker are the better flow of the must, the better aeration in the mash and the natural deacidification by the potassium contained in the black horse, which causes the tartar excretion during fermentation.

Furthermore, the Whole-body fermentation gives more structure and character, because the tannins appear denser and more compact. In addition, health-promoting antioxidants, which are contained in rappen similar to tea and chocolate, get into the wine and further enhance it. This method is preferred, especially in Burgundy. The huge tanks, the fermentation vats, are characteristic of this region.

Tannins

Tannins are the decisive quality feature of red wines and have many functions for the wine. On the palate, they create the typical “furry” feeling that red wine connoisseurs love so much and that white wine connoisseurs are just as uncomfortable with. By far the most important tannins in wine are tannins, which are contained in the skins and seeds of red grapes, but also in wood, which is why barriquisation is another way of enriching wines with tannins Life also depends on the right amount of tannins. Too much tannin causes an unpleasant bitter taste in the mouth, while too few tannins make the red wine appear flat and bland. Red wines have an average of 1800 mg / l tannins, while white wines only have 300 mg / l.

In addition to the astringent effect in the mouth, tannins give the wine its structure. In addition, they protect the wine from oxidation, so that tannins, as natural preservatives, determine the aging potential of a wine. They also prevent unwanted aromas from developing during the aging of the wine and stabilize its proteins. Tannins are measured as gallic acid in wine. A content of tannins that gives the red wine a fine-grained structure and is well integrated into its texture is considered ideal.



Tannins are the decisive quality feature of red wines and have many functions for the wine.On the palate, they create the typical “furry” feeling that red wine connoisseurs love so much and that white wine connoisseurs can't get any better Barriquising is another possibility to enrich wines with tannins.

As with many things in life, the right amount of tannins is also important. Too much tannin causes an unpleasant bitter taste in the mouth, while too few tannins make the red wine appear flat and bland. Red wines have an average of 1800 mg / l tannins, while white wines only have 300 mg / l.

In addition to the astringent effect in the mouth, tannins give the wine its structure. In addition, they protect the wine from oxidation, so that tannins, as natural preservatives, determine the aging potential of a wine. They also prevent unwanted aromas from developing during the aging of the wine and stabilize its proteins. Tannins are measured as gallic acid in wine. A content of tannins that gives the red wine a fine-grained structure and is well integrated into its texture is considered ideal.

Taste

For a long time, taste was measured in the categories sweet, sour, salty and bitter. It is only recently that umami (hearty) and greasy have been recognized as other flavors. In humans, taste is perceived through irritation of the specific sensory organs and taste buds. Spiciness does not belong in the categories of flavors, because the sensation of spiciness is not biologically an independent taste, but a pain message from the taste buds.

When it comes to the taste of a wine, however, the categories aroma, sweetness, acidity and Tannins matter. The complex wine taste is characterized by an all-encompassing taste perception that goes far beyond the taste buds and buds. A good wine can already be enjoyed on the palate (body), with the smell and with the eye. The acid supports the aroma of a wine and gives it freshness, while the sweetness in the alcohol (glycerine) gives the wine a warmer and softer note. Tannins are responsible for the content and strength of a wine.

Wine is also divided into dry, semi-dry, sweet and sweet. A dry wine is a fermented wine with a residual sugar content of up to 4g / l. If the residual sugar content is up to 12 g / l, the wine is semi-dry, while up to 45 g / l is defined as sweet. The wine is officially sweet with a residual sugar content of at least 45 g / l.

Guide l´Espresso

The Guide l´Espresso is a renowned Italian wine guide in which around 10,000 wines are evaluated according to a 20-point system. The 20 points are again divided into five bottles. Italy's 50 best wines and over 1,700 wines that are good value for money are listed separately.

Gambero Rosso

Gambero Rosso (red crab) is Italy's most renowned wine guide. In 2018, 2485 wineries and over 20,000 wines were tasted by 57 wine experts. The evaluation takes place in blind tests, which the wine connoisseurs carry out independently of one another. There is the following rating system, in which only wines from the rating are listed as good:

1 glass: good
2 glasses: very good
2 red glasses: very good, made it into the final round
3 glasses: Italian premium wines, winner in the final round

Die The highest rating is only achieved by around 2% of all wines tasted.The Gambero Rosso appeared for the first time as a supplement in the daily newspaper "Il Manifesto" in 1986 and has been an independent publisher since 1987, which also publishes a restaurant guide .

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